Syllabus

I. Setting the Scene

Week 1: January 12

Lecture:

  • The Seven Years’ War (Roberts)

Discussion: 

  • Introductions
  • What is the Revolution? Who is, and who isn’t, a revolutionary and why?

Practicum:

  • Blogging on WordPress

Common reading:

  • Taylor: Introduction and Chapter 1 (Colonies)

II. The Imperial Crisis (1763-1775)

Week 2: January 19

Lecture:

  • The Turbulent Backcountry, 1760-1775 (Bankhurst)
  • Guest Lecture: Will Fenton

Discussion:

  • The backcountry as distinct region in colonial America defined by conflict and exchange.
  • East vs. West?
  • The War of the Regulation and the Paxton Massacres/March: similarities? differences? relationship with the larger Imperial Crisis?
  • The evolution of “Whiteness” and Native American solidarity on the frontier.
  • What do colonial reactions to the Proclamation Line of 1763 tell us about the nature of the Imperial Crisis?

Practicum:

  • Reflections on blogging
  • Creating a Digital Archive
  • Digitization
  • Transcription
  • Metadata

Common Reading:

  • Reader: Landsman, “Liberty, Province, and Empire” (3-23).
  • Taylor: Chapter 2 (Land)
  • Rodney G.S. Carter, “Of Things Said and Unsaid: Power, Archival Silences, and Power in Silence,” Archivaria, The Journal of Canadian Archivists 61 (Spring 2006) (Online)
  • Primary Reading: Matthew Shaw, A declaration and remonstrance of the distressed and bleeding frontier inhabitants of the province of Pennsylvania […] (Philadelphia, 1764); Benjamin Franklin, A narrative of the late massacres, in Lancaster County, of a number of Indians, friends of this province, by persons unknown, (Philadelphia, 1764). Both pamphlets are available at digitalpaxton.org (Pamphlets 11 and 29, respectively).

Assignments Due by 10 PM Tuesday:

  • Set-up Blog (Group Project)
  • Blog post 1: Introduce yourself and your household. Who are you? Where do you live?  What is your community like? How long has your family been in the colonies? Where did you come from? (Household Member 1)

Week 3: January 26

Lecture:

  • Taxes, Consumption, and the Stamp Act (Bankhurst)

Discussion:

Practicum:

  • Reflections on Digital Paxton
  • Textual Analysis
  • Voyant

Common Reading:

  • Reader: Gould, “The Nation Abroad: The Atlantic Debate over Colonial Taxation,” (23-52); Breen, “‘Baubles of Britain’: The American and Consumer Revolutions of the Eighteenth Century” (53-75).
  • Taylor: Chapter 3 (Slaves)
  • Rockwell and Sinclair, Hermeneutica: Computer-Assisted Interpretation in the Humanities (2016), 10-13, 25-26, 32-43 – skim 26-31 (PDF Sakai)

Assignments Due by 10 PM Tuesday:

  • Transcription Assignment 1: Exploring the (Digital) Archive (Individual)
  • Blog post 2: Taxes or land? What concerns your family more coming out of the Seven Years’ War and starting to look to the next decade? In constructing your response, pull on the Taylor chapters (especially 2 and 3) and the Gould and Breen readings. Think about what factors (geographic location, class, gender, race, religion, rural vs urban) might shape how your household member would think about the most pressing issue of the time. (Household Member 2)

Week 4: February 2

Lecture:

  • Resistance and Response (Roberts)

Discussion:

Practicum:

  • Reflections on Using Voyant
  • Digital Editions
  • Optical Character Recognition (OCR)

Common Reading:

  • Reader: Holton, “‘Rebel against Rebel’: Enslaved Virginians and the Coming of the American Revolution” (92-113).
  • Alfred Young, The Shoemaker and the Tea Party (Part I)

Assignments Due by 10 PM Tuesday:

  • Digital Project 1: Keywords of Revolution (Group)
  • Blog post 3: Top-down or bottom-up? Should we study the events of the imperial crisis from the perspective of those who ran the empire or from the perspective of the man on the street? Where  does your household member see her or himself within the British world?  (Household Member 3)

III. The War for American Independence, 1775-1783.

Week 5: February 9

Lecture:

  • 1776: Common Sense and the Declaration of Independence (Roberts)

Discussion:

Practicum:

  • Reflections on OCR and digital editions

Common Reading:

  • Reader: Murrin, “1776: The Countercyclical Revolution” (76-91); Parkinson, “Twenty-seven Reasons for Independence” (114-122)
  • Taylor: Chapter 4 (Rebels)
  • Tom Paine, Common Sense (Sakai)

Assignments Due by 10 PM Tuesday:

  • Transcription Project 2: Editing Common Sense, Then and Now (Individual)
  • Blog post 4: Independence!?! How does your family react? Why are you for or against separation from the only political system you’ve ever known? (Household Member 4)

Week 6: February 16

Lecture:

  • The War for American Independence, part 1: the War in the North, 1775-1778 (Roberts).
  • Guest Lecture: Campaign 1776.

Discussion:

Practicum:

  • Digital Mapping
  • Excel
  • Google Fusion Tables

Common Reading:

  • Reader: Shy, “The Military Conflict Considered as a Revolutionary War” (123-138)
  • Taylor: Chapter 5 (Allies)

Assignments Due by 10 PM Tuesday:

  • Blog post 5: How does your family cope with the realities of war? Does the war affect you? (Household Member 1)

Week 7: February 23

Lecture:

  • The War for American Independence, part 2: The War in the South, 1778-1781 (Bankhurst).

Discussion:

  • The American Revolution as a Civil War.

Practicum:

  • Reflections on digital mapping
  • Data Visualization and Narratives
  • Timelines

Common Reading:

Assignments Due by 10 PM Tuesday:

  • Digital Project 2: Mapping Revolution (Group)
  • Blog post 6: From your vantage, what is the American Revolution? A civil war? A colonial war? A class war? (Household Member 2)

Week 8: March 2

Lecture:

  • Legacies of Loyalism (Bankhurst)

Discussion:

Practicum:

  • Reflections on timelines as data visualizations

Common Reading:

  • Reader: Jasanoff: “The Other Side of Revolution: Loyalists in the British Empire”(415-436); Norton, “Eighteenth-Century American Women in Peace and War: The Case of the Loyalists” (166-184)
  • Taylor: chapters 7 and 8 (Wests and Oceans)

Assignments Due by 10 PM Tuesday:

  • Digital Project 3: Adopting a Loyalist Refugee (Group)
  • Blog post 7: What should the government do with the disloyal? (Household Member 3)

Week 9: March 9

Loyola Spring Break!

Week 10: March 16

Shepherd Spring Break!

Loyola students will meet in University Archives and Special Collections at 4:15 pm on Thursday, March 16th, to look at original revolutionary-era books and manuscripts and to talk about final projects.

IV. The Articles of Confederation and Constitution, 1781-1791.

Week 11: March 23

Lecture:

  • Confederation and Constitution 1 (Roberts)

Discussion:

  • State Constitutionalism
  • Articles of Confederation
  • Economic Distress

Practicum:

  • Database Creation
  • Data Analysis
  • Census Records

Common Reading:

  • Reader: Nash, “Writing on a Clean Slate: The Struggle to Craft State Constitutions, 1776-1780” (209-235)
  • Taylor: 315-320, 337-339, 348-351, 353-374
  • Woody Holton, “‘Bricks Without Straw’: Grievances” from Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution (2007), 21-45 (Sakai).

Assignments Due by 10 PM Tuesday:

  • Blog post 8: How are you faring in the post-revolutionary economy? How is the economy impacting your household’s economic livelihood, your local community, and your new state? (Household Member 4)

Week 12: March 30

Lecture:

  • Confederation and Constitution 2 (Bankhurst)

Discussion:

Practicum: 

  • Reflections on Databases

Common Reading:

  • Reader: Wood, “Interests and Disinterestedness in the Making of the Constitution” (236-261); Cornell “Aristocracy Assailed: The Ideology of Backcountry Anti-Federalism” (282-303).
  • Taylor: 334-336, 340-347, 374-393

Assignments Due by 10 PM Tuesday:

  • Digital Project 4: Ratifying the Constitution (Group)
  • Blog post 9: Do you support the new federal Constitution? Why or why not? (Household Member 1)

V. The Age of Federalism and the Jeffersonian Ascendency, 1789-1800

Week 13: April 6

Lecture:

  • Washington, Adams, and US Expansion (Roberts)

Discussion:

  • How Radical was the American Revolution?

Common Reading:

  • Reader: Calloway, “The Continuing Revolution in Indian Country” (346-363); Taylor, “‘To Man their Rights’: The Frontier Revolution,” (304-322); Berlin, “The Revolution in Black Life” (323-345); Zagarri, “The Rights of Women”(364-392). Note: students will sign-up to read one of these essays in class.
  • Taylor: Chapter 11 (Partisans).

Assignments Due by 10 PM Tuesday:

  • Blog Post 10: Who is a citizen? Who should be a citizen? Why? What does it mean to be a citizen? (Household Member 2)
  • Blog post 11: What has been your revolutionary settlement? Has the Revolution turned out the way you and your household expected? Are you optimistic for the future? (Household Member 3)

Week 14: April 13

Easter Break!

VI. Legacies of the Revolution.

Week 15: April 20

Lecture:

  • Guest Speaker: Dr. Philip Mead, Director of Curatorial Affairs and Chief Historian at Museum of the American Revolution
  • The Election of 1796 and the Revolution of 1800 (Bankhurst)
  • When Does the Revolution End? (Roberts)

Common Reading:

Assignments Due by 10 PM Tuesday:

  • Blog post 12: How do you and your fellow Americans remember the American Revolution? How does that memory change overtime? (Household Member 4)